High-quality Somali translations by the translation agency Fasttranslator

The translation agency Fasttranslator
Let our capable project managers advise you. We are looking forward to working with you!
Somali is an Afro-Asiatic language spoken by around twelve million people, mainly in the Horn of Africa. It is the official language of Somalia, Somaliland, the so-called Somali region, and Ethiopia. Somali is regarded as an official language in Djibouti. Its roots are found in the native language of the Somali nomadic tribe traditionally spoken in the Horn of Africa. The spread of Islam in Africa influenced the growth of Somali significantly. The language contains a plethora of loanwords from Arabic and the former colonial languages, English and Italian. We speak Somali too! We are able to quickly and professionally translate your texts from Somali into over 150 languages and vice versa! We can consult you by phone or you can send us the text to be translated By email. In return, you will receive a quote from us as soon as possible.

Somali: a long tradition

For generations, Somali was passed down orally. For centuries, Somali was written using a special form of Arabic script called Wadaad. Linguists didn’t agree to standardize the Somali language and script until the modern age and eventually also decided to use the Latin alphabet. The standardization of Somali really experienced a boom after it was declared the official language of Somalia. All mass media, as well as the entire educational system of Somalia, had to be switched from English and Italian to Somali. The high amount of illiteracy in the Somali population was particularly dramatic. As of today, more than half of the inhabitants of Somalia can read and write. Somali has four distinct dialects. One is the so-called Isaaq, which is spoken in Northern Somalia and by the Isaaq clans. There are also the dialects of Darod in Central Somalia, the coastal dialects Cerulli and Moreno, and the so-called Oberjuba, otherwise known as Sab. The Darod dialect in particular forms the basis for Standard Somali, the native tongue of almost every person living in Somalia today. Our translators are all native speakers and can therefore provide accurate translations of your texts in terms of specific cultural and linguistic characteristics. Our project managers don’t only take language into consideration when selecting the right translator for your project; they also take into account your subject field. This guarantees that complicated medical, legal, or other technical documents are translated accurately. Let us consult you now over the phone.

How much does a translation into Somali cost?

The standard rate for translations from English into Somali is $ 0,27 per word and for translations from Somali into English the industry rate is $ 0,27. For new customers or large texts (more than 5,000 words) we may significantly reduce our rates. For urgent jobs that need several translators working simultaneously, we'll apply a surcharge. For a full list of rates per language, please visit Pricing.

The special characteristics

Outside of Somalia, the Somali language is spoken by the people who were forced to flee from the dictator Siad Barres. For this reason, groups of Somali speakers exist in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, as well as in some Scandinavian countries, Italy, and the Netherlands. These native speakers of Somali that live outside of Somalia make up a group of over three million people. The Somali language has many idiosyncrasies. As a member of the Cushitic languages, Somali is considered an inflectional language. The grammatical meaning of a word in a sentence is emphasized by a strong inflection. Nouns are declined as well in Somali and are modified by an article. In Somali, a noun can be defined as masculine or feminine. Contact us today for professional translations. We look forward to hearing from you!

2015-10-09T13:52:36.5619153Z

Mariana Mellor
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